Floating

“Clouds come floating into my life, no longer to carry rain or usher storm, but to add color to my sunset sky.” — Rabindranath Tagore “Creativity is a lot like looking at the world through a kaleidoscope. You look at a set of elements, the same ones everyone else sees, but then reassemble those floating … More Floating

Wide screen

“The sky is an infinite movie to me. I never get tired of looking at what’s happening up there.”  — K. D. Lang *   *   * Abstract sunset — Oyster River, Old Saybrook, CT, photo by Mary O’Connor © 2017

Idle time

“When you’re a kid, you lay in the grass and watch the clouds going over, and you literally don’t have a thought in your mind. It’s purely meditation, and we lose that.” — Dick Van Dyke  “Rest is not idleness, and to lie sometimes on the grass under trees on a summer’s day, listening to … More Idle time

Wall of Sky

Sometimes I sit with my back pressed against a wall of sky, until the winds shift and the clouds pass by. * * * Poem, Wall of Sky by Mary O’Connor, originally published in Dreams of a Wingless Child  © 2007 Wheatmark, Tuscon, Ariz. © 2007. Photo, Charles W. Morgan whaling ship docked in New London, CT, by Jan … More Wall of Sky

Bones of Memory

In the beginning—time still untarnished by tongues of friends telling tales of unrequited passion and by knowledge yet to be understood—pockets and purses held the roots of recollection: tickets torn to their stubs, clovers plucked for their leaves of luck, valentines pasted with tinseled love, prized dance cards, dutifully, if not lovingly, signed by Curt, by Joe and … More Bones of Memory

“There are no rules of architecture…

“for a castle in the clouds.” — Gilbert K. Chesterton The Charles W. Morgan, the last of an American whaling fleet that once numbered more than 2,700 vessels, lies at rest in New London, Connecticut, first stop of her 38th voyage, made in celebration of her complete restoration. Capable of carrying approximately 13,000 square feet of sail when fully rigged, the classic … More “There are no rules of architecture…